Icon Hunt

Oct. 11th, 2012 05:13 pm
jennythereader: (Strawberries *)
I think I need to find or make a better cooking icon. All the food ones I have are either too specific or too generic.

Icon Hunt

Oct. 11th, 2012 05:13 pm
jennythereader: (Strawberries *)
I think I need to find or make a better cooking icon. All the food ones I have are either too specific or too generic.
jennythereader: (Default)
These weren't bad, but they weren't quite worth the effort either. The recipe as in the book is in normal print, while my notes are in italics.

2 pounds ground lean beef
1 green bell pepper, cored, seeded, and minced These need to be cut as small as you can manage
1/2 cup chopped scallions (green onions) Again, chop these as small as possible
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon paprika
red pepper flakes to taste
salt to taste
6 hamburger buns, toasted If I make these again I'll do 8 buns
sliced tomatoes I skipped these
sour cream Skipped this too

Combine the beef, green pepper, scallions, and garlic in a mixing bowl. Add the cumin, oregano, thyme, paprika, and red pepper flakes and salt to taste, and mix until blended. Shape the meat into 6 patties. I'd do 8 instead. 6 patties makes for larger burgers than I like.

Broil, fry, or grill the meat to desired doneness. Place the hamburgers on toasted buns and top with sliced tomatoes and sour cream. I didn't do the recommened toppings. Instead we did ordinary burger toppings and onion jam.

From The Silver Palate Good Times Cookbook
jennythereader: (Default)
These weren't bad, but they weren't quite worth the effort either. The recipe as in the book is in normal print, while my notes are in italics.

2 pounds ground lean beef
1 green bell pepper, cored, seeded, and minced These need to be cut as small as you can manage
1/2 cup chopped scallions (green onions) Again, chop these as small as possible
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon paprika
red pepper flakes to taste
salt to taste
6 hamburger buns, toasted If I make these again I'll do 8 buns
sliced tomatoes I skipped these
sour cream Skipped this too

Combine the beef, green pepper, scallions, and garlic in a mixing bowl. Add the cumin, oregano, thyme, paprika, and red pepper flakes and salt to taste, and mix until blended. Shape the meat into 6 patties. I'd do 8 instead. 6 patties makes for larger burgers than I like.

Broil, fry, or grill the meat to desired doneness. Place the hamburgers on toasted buns and top with sliced tomatoes and sour cream. I didn't do the recommened toppings. Instead we did ordinary burger toppings and onion jam.

From The Silver Palate Good Times Cookbook
jennythereader: (Default)
I made a double batch of Ham Casserole, with a few changes, last night.

The biggest change I made was to replace the second onion that a normal double batch would need with the leftover scallions and garlic scapes from last week's farm share (I think it was about 6 of each). That worked really well, except that I think I need to pre-cook the garlic scapes a little longer. They were still pretty tough after cooking.

I added about a cup of diced green pepper, which blended well with all the other flavors.

I also tripled the horseradish instead of doubling it. You can't have too much horseradish in this casserole.

One change that didn't work was using "Clear Value" brand cream of mushroom soup. They're the cheapest brand Price Chopper sells, but the quality is noticably worse than even the store brand. I think I'm blaming it for the casserole being a little too salty for my taste.
jennythereader: (Default)
I made a double batch of Ham Casserole, with a few changes, last night.

The biggest change I made was to replace the second onion that a normal double batch would need with the leftover scallions and garlic scapes from last week's farm share (I think it was about 6 of each). That worked really well, except that I think I need to pre-cook the garlic scapes a little longer. They were still pretty tough after cooking.

I added about a cup of diced green pepper, which blended well with all the other flavors.

I also tripled the horseradish instead of doubling it. You can't have too much horseradish in this casserole.

One change that didn't work was using "Clear Value" brand cream of mushroom soup. They're the cheapest brand Price Chopper sells, but the quality is noticably worse than even the store brand. I think I'm blaming it for the casserole being a little too salty for my taste.
jennythereader: (Opal *)
I remember Mom making this all the time when I was little, but I don't think I've had it since she moved to New York. This was definitely my first attempt making it.

The recipe as Mom gave it to me is in bold print, with changes that I made this time in regular print after the original. Any changes for next time will be after the instructions.

Chicken & Yellow Rice
  • 1 fryer, cut up I couldn't find anything labled a "fryer" at the store, so I used a "Grade A Chicken, split." It was 3.9 lbs.
  • 1/3 cup margarine I used butter, and rounded down to 5 TBSP (since 1/3 of a cup is a pain to cut from a stick)
  • 1 cup uncooked rice
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder I used a heaping 1/2 teaspoon. There's no such thing as too much garlic.
  • 1.5 teaspoon salt I used seasoned salt.
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper I didn't measure this, just shook it generously over the dish.
  • 1 teaspoon tumeric
  • 2.5 cups boiling water I used a pint of my homemade stock, and enough water to complete the measure.

Brown chicken in margarine. Place in a shallow 2 qt casserole dish. Sprinkle rice & spices over chicken. Mix the water with the pan juices & pour over chicken. Cover & bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

********************
Notes for next time:
  • That chicken was not the right choice. The amount was OK, but I don't remember that many small bones when Mom used to make it. I'm not sure what I should have used instead.
  • Some of the rice was underdone. I think if I had used the right size casserole dish (I used a 3 qt dish) it would have worked better. Either that or more stock/water. Or maybe both.
jennythereader: (Opal *)
I remember Mom making this all the time when I was little, but I don't think I've had it since she moved to New York. This was definitely my first attempt making it.

The recipe as Mom gave it to me is in bold print, with changes that I made this time in regular print after the original. Any changes for next time will be after the instructions.

Chicken & Yellow Rice
  • 1 fryer, cut up I couldn't find anything labled a "fryer" at the store, so I used a "Grade A Chicken, split." It was 3.9 lbs.
  • 1/3 cup margarine I used butter, and rounded down to 5 TBSP (since 1/3 of a cup is a pain to cut from a stick)
  • 1 cup uncooked rice
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder I used a heaping 1/2 teaspoon. There's no such thing as too much garlic.
  • 1.5 teaspoon salt I used seasoned salt.
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper I didn't measure this, just shook it generously over the dish.
  • 1 teaspoon tumeric
  • 2.5 cups boiling water I used a pint of my homemade stock, and enough water to complete the measure.

Brown chicken in margarine. Place in a shallow 2 qt casserole dish. Sprinkle rice & spices over chicken. Mix the water with the pan juices & pour over chicken. Cover & bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

********************
Notes for next time:
  • That chicken was not the right choice. The amount was OK, but I don't remember that many small bones when Mom used to make it. I'm not sure what I should have used instead.
  • Some of the rice was underdone. I think if I had used the right size casserole dish (I used a 3 qt dish) it would have worked better. Either that or more stock/water. Or maybe both.
jennythereader: (Time for Dessert)
This is what I made:

Maple-Glazed Pork Chops

CHOPS
4 pork chops
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

GLAZE
3/4 cup maple syrup
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp dry mustard (this was my own addition)

Grilling Directions:
1) Heat grill. Rub both sides of pork chops with salt and pepper. In small saucepan, combine all glaze ingredients; mix well. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Set aside.

2) When ready to grill, place pork chops on gas grill over medium heat or on charcoal grill 4-6 inches from medium coals. Cook 15 minutes, turning once.

3) Brush pork chops with glaze. Cook an additional 10 minutes or until pork chops are no longer pink in center, turning once and brushing frequently with glaze. Bring any remaining glaze to a boil; serve with pork chops.

From SEASONAL CELEBRATIONS COAST TO COAST

We also had baked butternut squash brushed with the same glaze and a cherry wine that Dad and Nancy brought from Michigan on their visit last summer.

The only change I think I'm going to make next time is to increase the amount of mustard.
jennythereader: (Time for Dessert)
This is what I made:

Maple-Glazed Pork Chops

CHOPS
4 pork chops
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

GLAZE
3/4 cup maple syrup
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp dry mustard (this was my own addition)

Grilling Directions:
1) Heat grill. Rub both sides of pork chops with salt and pepper. In small saucepan, combine all glaze ingredients; mix well. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Set aside.

2) When ready to grill, place pork chops on gas grill over medium heat or on charcoal grill 4-6 inches from medium coals. Cook 15 minutes, turning once.

3) Brush pork chops with glaze. Cook an additional 10 minutes or until pork chops are no longer pink in center, turning once and brushing frequently with glaze. Bring any remaining glaze to a boil; serve with pork chops.

From SEASONAL CELEBRATIONS COAST TO COAST

We also had baked butternut squash brushed with the same glaze and a cherry wine that Dad and Nancy brought from Michigan on their visit last summer.

The only change I think I'm going to make next time is to increase the amount of mustard.

Squash!

Dec. 8th, 2011 01:18 pm
jennythereader: (* Midwestern Girl)
Growing up I hated squash in all of its forms. Summer squash or winter, it didn't matter. The stuff was gross.

Over the last few years I came up with some ways to prepare summer squash that I like, but I hadn't found anything good to do with winter squash.

Until last night.

Tom chopped a butternut squash in half for me. I cleaned out the seeds and pulp, then cut it into slices about an inch wide, peeled the slices, and cut them into bite-sized pieces. They went into a pan. I drizzled 2 TBSP of olive oil over them, sprinkled on salt, pepper, 2 tsp of dry rosemary, some garlic powder and then stirred until everything seemed evenly distributed. I then baked them for a little over an hour at 350.

OMG, so good.

I served it with meatloaf and bread for a very satisfying winter supper.

(Note, if you have a vegetable garden or are part of a CSA this book is your friend. Vegetables Every Day by Jack Bishop)

Squash!

Dec. 8th, 2011 01:18 pm
jennythereader: (* Midwestern Girl)
Growing up I hated squash in all of its forms. Summer squash or winter, it didn't matter. The stuff was gross.

Over the last few years I came up with some ways to prepare summer squash that I like, but I hadn't found anything good to do with winter squash.

Until last night.

Tom chopped a butternut squash in half for me. I cleaned out the seeds and pulp, then cut it into slices about an inch wide, peeled the slices, and cut them into bite-sized pieces. They went into a pan. I drizzled 2 TBSP of olive oil over them, sprinkled on salt, pepper, 2 tsp of dry rosemary, some garlic powder and then stirred until everything seemed evenly distributed. I then baked them for a little over an hour at 350.

OMG, so good.

I served it with meatloaf and bread for a very satisfying winter supper.

(Note, if you have a vegetable garden or are part of a CSA this book is your friend. Vegetables Every Day by Jack Bishop)

New Dish!

Nov. 14th, 2011 08:35 pm
jennythereader: (Default)
I tried a new dish for dinner tonight: Beef and Cabbage Wraps. I'll put the recipe behind a cut at the end of the post.

They were good, but not perfect. Definitely in need of tweaking. Tom & I both agree they need a little more seasoning, but we can't decide what, beyond some garlic. Maybe curry, maybe pepper, maybe just a more spicy barbecue sauce.

We also coined a new phrase. An Alton Brown step is one that improves what ever you're working on by 5%, but requires 10% more effort on your part. For example, warming tortillas in the oven when they are already adequately soft.

The recipe: Beef and Cabbage Wraps )

New Dish!

Nov. 14th, 2011 08:35 pm
jennythereader: (Default)
I tried a new dish for dinner tonight: Beef and Cabbage Wraps. I'll put the recipe behind a cut at the end of the post.

They were good, but not perfect. Definitely in need of tweaking. Tom & I both agree they need a little more seasoning, but we can't decide what, beyond some garlic. Maybe curry, maybe pepper, maybe just a more spicy barbecue sauce.

We also coined a new phrase. An Alton Brown step is one that improves what ever you're working on by 5%, but requires 10% more effort on your part. For example, warming tortillas in the oven when they are already adequately soft.

The recipe: Beef and Cabbage Wraps )
jennythereader: (Default)
1) My iPod is playing me music again! I didn't change anything, but I don't know if Tom changed anything on the music server or if it just had a change of heart.

2) I really need to get (or make) a good pair of fingerless gloves. I'm wearing an improvised pair as part of my Halloween costume, and am amazed at what a difference they're making. If anybody knows a really simple knitting pattern for some, send me the link.

3) Friday night I made this dish for dinner. It was... a little on the bland side. That might have been because I used the wrong type of mustard, or because I used more stock than I should have. I'll do some tweaking before I make it again. (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] shadesong for originally posting the link to the recipe.)
jennythereader: (Default)
1) My iPod is playing me music again! I didn't change anything, but I don't know if Tom changed anything on the music server or if it just had a change of heart.

2) I really need to get (or make) a good pair of fingerless gloves. I'm wearing an improvised pair as part of my Halloween costume, and am amazed at what a difference they're making. If anybody knows a really simple knitting pattern for some, send me the link.

3) Friday night I made this dish for dinner. It was... a little on the bland side. That might have been because I used the wrong type of mustard, or because I used more stock than I should have. I'll do some tweaking before I make it again. (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] shadesong for originally posting the link to the recipe.)
jennythereader: (Blue Fractal)
I just did the math for how much money I saved last weekend by making my own chicken stock.

I made 6.75 quarts. My local grocery store sells low sodium, organic chicken stock for $3.99 a quart. That means that right now I have $26.93 worth of stock in the freezer. Maybe a little less, because while all the vegetables I used were organic, the chicken wasn't. Let's call it $25.00 even.

How much did it cost me to make?

Nothing.

Or at least, nothing more than I would have spent anyway in the course of a couple of weeks. Every major ingredient in that stock was something that a few years ago I would have thrown away. The meat and bones were the carcass of a chicken I had roasted earlier in the week. After we had dinner that night, we pulled all the meat we could off of it, and then stashed what was left in the freezer. The vegetables were things like carrot tops, celery leaves, slightly mushy leeks, and other things that I wasn't going to use in any other recipe. The only other ingredients were water, a little salt, a little apple cider vinegar, and some peppercorns.

Added: I maybe spent $5.00 on those additional ingredients. Probably less, but it might have been that much. That's at least $20 less than it would have cost me to buy the same amount of stock. That doesn't sound like much, but if I make the same amount every couple of months it will save me at least $100 over the course of a year.

I'd like to do the same sort of analysis for my homemade applesauce, but I didn't do as good a job tracking how much I made, and I didn't track how many apples I used for it at all. I suspect the savings aren't as dramatic as for the stock. /Added

I started with the stock instructions posted by [livejournal.com profile] meilin_miranda over in the BPAL forums a long time ago and adapted and changed to suit my taste. I've already started filling up the giant ziploc bag in the freezer for the next round.
jennythereader: (Blue Fractal)
I just did the math for how much money I saved last weekend by making my own chicken stock.

I made 6.75 quarts. My local grocery store sells low sodium, organic chicken stock for $3.99 a quart. That means that right now I have $26.93 worth of stock in the freezer. Maybe a little less, because while all the vegetables I used were organic, the chicken wasn't. Let's call it $25.00 even.

How much did it cost me to make?

Nothing.

Or at least, nothing more than I would have spent anyway in the course of a couple of weeks. Every major ingredient in that stock was something that a few years ago I would have thrown away. The meat and bones were the carcass of a chicken I had roasted earlier in the week. After we had dinner that night, we pulled all the meat we could off of it, and then stashed what was left in the freezer. The vegetables were things like carrot tops, celery leaves, slightly mushy leeks, and other things that I wasn't going to use in any other recipe. The only other ingredients were water, a little salt, a little apple cider vinegar, and some peppercorns.

Added: I maybe spent $5.00 on those additional ingredients. Probably less, but it might have been that much. That's at least $20 less than it would have cost me to buy the same amount of stock. That doesn't sound like much, but if I make the same amount every couple of months it will save me at least $100 over the course of a year.

I'd like to do the same sort of analysis for my homemade applesauce, but I didn't do as good a job tracking how much I made, and I didn't track how many apples I used for it at all. I suspect the savings aren't as dramatic as for the stock. /Added

I started with the stock instructions posted by [livejournal.com profile] meilin_miranda over in the BPAL forums a long time ago and adapted and changed to suit my taste. I've already started filling up the giant ziploc bag in the freezer for the next round.
jennythereader: (Strawberries 001)
 Inspired by [livejournal.com profile] standuponit's recent post, I decided to try my own maple/apple/cheese concoction for supper tonight.

This is what I used:
a small loaf of french bread
maple syrup (unmeasured, more than a tablespoon but less than a quarter cup)
half of a pink lady apple, sliced
goat cheese, about 2.5 oz (it was a 4 oz package, and I used a bit more than half)

This is what I did:
Cut the bread in half lengthwise. Since it was just me tonight, I set one of the pieces aside for later.
Drizzle maple syrup over the bread.
Lay the apple slices on top of the bread.
Crumble the cheese over the apples.

A picture at this point


Bake in the toaster oven for about 20 minutes at 350.



It came out pretty good, but not quite what I had expected. Much sweeter for one thing. Next time I think I'll go easier on the syrup and probably use a more strongly flavored cheese. I'll probably also cut the apples smaller and bake it at a higher temperature.
jennythereader: (Strawberries 001)
 Inspired by [livejournal.com profile] standuponit's recent post, I decided to try my own maple/apple/cheese concoction for supper tonight.

This is what I used:
a small loaf of french bread
maple syrup (unmeasured, more than a tablespoon but less than a quarter cup)
half of a pink lady apple, sliced
goat cheese, about 2.5 oz (it was a 4 oz package, and I used a bit more than half)

This is what I did:
Cut the bread in half lengthwise. Since it was just me tonight, I set one of the pieces aside for later.
Drizzle maple syrup over the bread.
Lay the apple slices on top of the bread.
Crumble the cheese over the apples.

A picture at this point


Bake in the toaster oven for about 20 minutes at 350.



It came out pretty good, but not quite what I had expected. Much sweeter for one thing. Next time I think I'll go easier on the syrup and probably use a more strongly flavored cheese. I'll probably also cut the apples smaller and bake it at a higher temperature.

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