jennythereader: (* Card Catalog)
In researching my family tree I was reminded of our connection to Rodger Young, a WWII hero. (He was a cousin of my Grandmother, but I haven't tracked down the exact relationship yet.)

I re-read the wikipedia page and found a couple other sites that talk about him and about the song written about him. This profile, as over-romanticized as it is, especially got me thinking.

When the writers of Captain America re-worked Steve Rogers' pre-serum story, was Rodger Young's story somewhere in the back of their minds?

And now I want to read a story in which Rogers hears about Young's life and death. Maybe Colonel Phillips mentions him as someone else who was considered for the serum project.
jennythereader: (Blue Fractal)
I was thinking about this the other day, and I realized that when it comes to TV and movies, I have a set of default assumptions I make unless something in the show contradicts it.

1) Movies are set around the year they come out. TV shows air (more or less) in real time. Obviously, this doesn't have to be explicitly contradicted. Clothing/technology/other background elements that are clearly from a different time period is enough.

2) Characters are pretty much the same age as the actor playing them.

3) Characters are the same ethnic background as the actor playing them. I think lots of people have this assumption, which is why casting white actors as non-white characters is problematic.

Those first three assumptions are fairly harmless most of the time, although the third leaves me vulnerable to stupid casting choices in productions adapted from other media. The next couple are not so harmless. I'm trying to pull them into the light and take a closer look at them.

4) Characters are straight. Given that a substantial minority (the last number I heard is 10%) of people are not straight, any show or movie with more than a dozen people should have at least one gay or bisexual character. The fact that I assume any character the writers don't come right out and say is LGBTQ (I think I got the order of the acronym wrong) is straight isn't good because it minimizes the presence of gay people in the world.

5) Characters are cis-gendered. This is a bad assumption because it minimizes the existence of trans people in the same way that assumption 4 minimizes gay people.

I could probably come up with a few others if I tried, but this seems like enough for now.
jennythereader: (Blue Fractal)
I was thinking about this the other day, and I realized that when it comes to TV and movies, I have a set of default assumptions I make unless something in the show contradicts it.

1) Movies are set around the year they come out. TV shows air (more or less) in real time. Obviously, this doesn't have to be explicitly contradicted. Clothing/technology/other background elements that are clearly from a different time period is enough.

2) Characters are pretty much the same age as the actor playing them.

3) Characters are the same ethnic background as the actor playing them. I think lots of people have this assumption, which is why casting white actors as non-white characters is problematic.

Those first three assumptions are fairly harmless most of the time, although the third leaves me vulnerable to stupid casting choices in productions adapted from other media. The next couple are not so harmless. I'm trying to pull them into the light and take a closer look at them.

4) Characters are straight. Given that a substantial minority (the last number I heard is 10%) of people are not straight, any show or movie with more than a dozen people should have at least one gay or bisexual character. The fact that I assume any character the writers don't come right out and say is LGBTQ (I think I got the order of the acronym wrong) is straight isn't good because it minimizes the presence of gay people in the world.

5) Characters are cis-gendered. This is a bad assumption because it minimizes the existence of trans people in the same way that assumption 4 minimizes gay people.

I could probably come up with a few others if I tried, but this seems like enough for now.
jennythereader: (Default)
I've seen a couple versions of this floating around, but this is the one I decided to do. It might take me a bit more than 10 days, because I'll probably only do it on weekdays.

Day One: Ten things you want to do some day.
Day Two: Nine things about yourself.
Day Three: Eight qualities you think are awesome in other people.
Day Four: Seven (semi)interesting things you've pondered or thought about recently.
Day Five: Six things you are glad you did.
Day Six: Five books/movies/tv series/etc that you'd recommend.
Day Seven: Four silly quirks
Day Eight: Three pet peeves
Day Nine: Two things for which you're proud of yourself.
Day Ten: One secret plan.

1. The Saturdays (Melendy Quartet) by Elizabeth Enright One of my favorites since I was a very little girl.
2. Bound for Glory A bio-pic based on Woody Guthrie's memoir.
3. Girl Genius The best webcomic out there. They've won the Hugo Award three times, and are generally awesome.
4. Holly Near A folk singer with a beautiful voice. One of my favorite things about her is how she advocates for all sorts of issues I'm passionate about, without sacrificing the music. HARP - A Time To Sing!, which she recorded with Arlo Guthrie, Ronnie Gilbert, and Pete Seeger in 1984 is one of my favorite live albums.
5. The Avengers This is the first movie in years that I've seen twice in the theatre. I like it so much that I was seriously tempted to see it three times in the theatre. I don't think I've ever even considered doing that before. the DVD will be purchased as soon as it's available.
jennythereader: (Default)
I've seen a couple versions of this floating around, but this is the one I decided to do. It might take me a bit more than 10 days, because I'll probably only do it on weekdays.

Day One: Ten things you want to do some day.
Day Two: Nine things about yourself.
Day Three: Eight qualities you think are awesome in other people.
Day Four: Seven (semi)interesting things you've pondered or thought about recently.
Day Five: Six things you are glad you did.
Day Six: Five books/movies/tv series/etc that you'd recommend.
Day Seven: Four silly quirks
Day Eight: Three pet peeves
Day Nine: Two things for which you're proud of yourself.
Day Ten: One secret plan.

1. The Saturdays (Melendy Quartet) by Elizabeth Enright One of my favorites since I was a very little girl.
2. Bound for Glory A bio-pic based on Woody Guthrie's memoir.
3. Girl Genius The best webcomic out there. They've won the Hugo Award three times, and are generally awesome.
4. Holly Near A folk singer with a beautiful voice. One of my favorite things about her is how she advocates for all sorts of issues I'm passionate about, without sacrificing the music. HARP - A Time To Sing!, which she recorded with Arlo Guthrie, Ronnie Gilbert, and Pete Seeger in 1984 is one of my favorite live albums.
5. The Avengers This is the first movie in years that I've seen twice in the theatre. I like it so much that I was seriously tempted to see it three times in the theatre. I don't think I've ever even considered doing that before. the DVD will be purchased as soon as it's available.
jennythereader: (Default)
Back here, I said I had a post brewing on this topic.

The way I see it, there are three major ways fan authors are depicting Captain America's adjustment to the strange new version of America he's found himself in.

1) He adapts with no problems at all, other than a tendency to not get pop culture references. This pretty much always includes an very modern attitude towards sexual behavior. At the most extreme, authors who take this route have Steve falling into bed with anybody who wiggles their eyebrows at him, and picking up new technology almost as easily as Stark.

I feel that short of changing him into a villain, this is about as far from Captain America's character as it's possible to be. Luckily most of the fandom seems to agree with me and it seems to be the least common depiction.

**********

2) He can't adapt at all. It's too new, too busy, too selfish and hedonistic for someone as straitlaced and moral as Steve Rogers. At the far extreme he can't deal with women or minorities in power, the idea of people being open about their homosexuality freaks him out (much less the idea of marriage equality), how comfortable people are with sexuality in general grosses him out, and he even loses it when people swear around him.

I feel that while the less extreme versions of this might hold true for "random 1940's guy dumped into the 2010's," in general it's only a slightly more accurate a depiction of Cap than the first one is. Helping the underdog is just too much a part of his personality for me to believe he would freak out when society starts to think that maybe there shouldn't be underdogs at all. The most extreme versions of this depiction are almost as rare as (1), but the milder versions are a lot more common, and bleed into (3).

This one seems to come from a combination of authors mistaking Steve's lack of first-hand sexual experience for prudery and a misunderstanding of the 1930's & 1940's. Just because the movies of the era that are still available are mostly pretty clean doesn't mean that everyone's behavior was all the time. As my grandmother said to me once, people are still people no matter when they live. All that changes is how public they're able to be about it.

**********

3) Steve is frequently surprised and confused, but once he wraps his mind around them he thinks most of the changes are for the better, or at least neutral. To me, this version is the most true to character and thankfully it seems to be the most common.

Captain America really is Captain Steve Rogers of the US Army, and I guarantee that even if he wasn't getting up to shenanigans himself, between his time with the USO and his time fighting in Europe he had plenty of opportunity to witness as much as he cared to and probably a bit more. He led an elite unit that was racially integrated and worked with/dated a woman officer who outranked him. As I said above, he stood up for the little guy every chance he had, even when he couldn't actually make a difference, and I just can't picture him disapproving of wider society catching up.

I'm never sure how much sense this sort of post will make to other people, so I might do some editing to clarify things. I'll try to note it if I do.
Edits: 6-7-12; 9:37am I made a few formatting and punctuation changes that hopefully will make this a little clearer.
jennythereader: (Default)
Back here, I said I had a post brewing on this topic.

The way I see it, there are three major ways fan authors are depicting Captain America's adjustment to the strange new version of America he's found himself in.

1) He adapts with no problems at all, other than a tendency to not get pop culture references. This pretty much always includes an very modern attitude towards sexual behavior. At the most extreme, authors who take this route have Steve falling into bed with anybody who wiggles their eyebrows at him, and picking up new technology almost as easily as Stark.

I feel that short of changing him into a villain, this is about as far from Captain America's character as it's possible to be. Luckily most of the fandom seems to agree with me and it seems to be the least common depiction.

**********

2) He can't adapt at all. It's too new, too busy, too selfish and hedonistic for someone as straitlaced and moral as Steve Rogers. At the far extreme he can't deal with women or minorities in power, the idea of people being open about their homosexuality freaks him out (much less the idea of marriage equality), how comfortable people are with sexuality in general grosses him out, and he even loses it when people swear around him.

I feel that while the less extreme versions of this might hold true for "random 1940's guy dumped into the 2010's," in general it's only a slightly more accurate a depiction of Cap than the first one is. Helping the underdog is just too much a part of his personality for me to believe he would freak out when society starts to think that maybe there shouldn't be underdogs at all. The most extreme versions of this depiction are almost as rare as (1), but the milder versions are a lot more common, and bleed into (3).

This one seems to come from a combination of authors mistaking Steve's lack of first-hand sexual experience for prudery and a misunderstanding of the 1930's & 1940's. Just because the movies of the era that are still available are mostly pretty clean doesn't mean that everyone's behavior was all the time. As my grandmother said to me once, people are still people no matter when they live. All that changes is how public they're able to be about it.

**********

3) Steve is frequently surprised and confused, but once he wraps his mind around them he thinks most of the changes are for the better, or at least neutral. To me, this version is the most true to character and thankfully it seems to be the most common.

Captain America really is Captain Steve Rogers of the US Army, and I guarantee that even if he wasn't getting up to shenanigans himself, between his time with the USO and his time fighting in Europe he had plenty of opportunity to witness as much as he cared to and probably a bit more. He led an elite unit that was racially integrated and worked with/dated a woman officer who outranked him. As I said above, he stood up for the little guy every chance he had, even when he couldn't actually make a difference, and I just can't picture him disapproving of wider society catching up.

I'm never sure how much sense this sort of post will make to other people, so I might do some editing to clarify things. I'll try to note it if I do.
Edits: 6-7-12; 9:37am I made a few formatting and punctuation changes that hopefully will make this a little clearer.
jennythereader: (* mmmBooksmmm!)
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Probably Starship Troopers. I love the book, but the movie is so different. I could have lived with them changing details in order to work better on the screen, but they didn't even manage to keep the feel and emotional tone of the novel. There are other movies I've hated more at the moment of watching them, but none have left the same sort of lasting foul taste in my mouth.

(And don't even get me started on the third movie with Megan Follows that claims to be based on Anne of Green Gables and its sequels. I refuse to watch it.)
jennythereader: (* mmmBooksmmm!)
[Error: unknown template qotd]

Probably Starship Troopers. I love the book, but the movie is so different. I could have lived with them changing details in order to work better on the screen, but they didn't even manage to keep the feel and emotional tone of the novel. There are other movies I've hated more at the moment of watching them, but none have left the same sort of lasting foul taste in my mouth.

(And don't even get me started on the third movie with Megan Follows that claims to be based on Anne of Green Gables and its sequels. I refuse to watch it.)
jennythereader: (Default)
Body: Everything seems OK this morning. Although... I'm sneezing a lot. Hopefully this doesn't mean I'm coming down with a cold.

Stress Level: 1

Reading: I'm still reading Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain.

Hearing: Music so far, and probably podcasts later.

Etsy Find: Tubes of Win. These are not exactly lip gloss, and not exactly lip balm, and not exactly lipstick, but they sound really cool. You can also buy the individual colors separately.

Project Follow-up: Had a really great visit with my friends. One of the highlights was going to see The King's Speech. It was perfect. One of the best movies I've ever seen in my life.

Tonight's Project: Gym, and I'm not sure what else.

My Valentinr - jennythe_reader
Get your own valentinr
jennythereader: (Default)
Body: Everything seems OK this morning. Although... I'm sneezing a lot. Hopefully this doesn't mean I'm coming down with a cold.

Stress Level: 1

Reading: I'm still reading Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain.

Hearing: Music so far, and probably podcasts later.

Etsy Find: Tubes of Win. These are not exactly lip gloss, and not exactly lip balm, and not exactly lipstick, but they sound really cool. You can also buy the individual colors separately.

Project Follow-up: Had a really great visit with my friends. One of the highlights was going to see The King's Speech. It was perfect. One of the best movies I've ever seen in my life.

Tonight's Project: Gym, and I'm not sure what else.

My Valentinr - jennythe_reader
Get your own valentinr
jennythereader: (Default)
So yesterday I went down to NYC to catch a midnight showing of 2001: A Space Odyssey with a friend. I'd never seen it before, and I'm really glad I went. The movie was fascinating, and hanging out with a friend in the city was a blast. We're going to try to do something similar again, although hopefully with less sleep deprivation.
jennythereader: (Default)
So yesterday I went down to NYC to catch a midnight showing of 2001: A Space Odyssey with a friend. I'd never seen it before, and I'm really glad I went. The movie was fascinating, and hanging out with a friend in the city was a blast. We're going to try to do something similar again, although hopefully with less sleep deprivation.
jennythereader: (Getting There *)
I'm going on a mini-adventure tonight. A friend discovered that the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey is playing at midnight tonight. It's one of his favorite movies, and it's one I've always wanted to see, so we're going.

The only catch: the theater is in New York City. For him, it's only a minor nuisance. He works in the city, and has to be there super early on Sunday mornings anyway, so after the movie he'll just go to the office and nap for a couple hours and then clock in even earlier than normal. For me... I'll end up having to kill basically the entire night before I can get a train back to my car.

It's going to be an interesting 24 hours. :)
jennythereader: (Getting There *)
I'm going on a mini-adventure tonight. A friend discovered that the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey is playing at midnight tonight. It's one of his favorite movies, and it's one I've always wanted to see, so we're going.

The only catch: the theater is in New York City. For him, it's only a minor nuisance. He works in the city, and has to be there super early on Sunday mornings anyway, so after the movie he'll just go to the office and nap for a couple hours and then clock in even earlier than normal. For me... I'll end up having to kill basically the entire night before I can get a train back to my car.

It's going to be an interesting 24 hours. :)

hey Sunny:

May. 15th, 2008 01:15 pm
jennythereader: (Parakeets *)
Remember what I said the other day about a Fraggle Rock movie?

hey Sunny:

May. 15th, 2008 01:15 pm
jennythereader: (Parakeets *)
Remember what I said the other day about a Fraggle Rock movie?
jennythereader: (Default)
An author you read for the first time in 2007 I found several new (to me) authors this year. The two best were probably Elizabeth Bear and Charles De Lint. Other authors I found this year included Jo Walton, S.M. Stirling, and Stephen Baxter

A band/musician you heard for the first time in 2007 Bunches, most via Pandora.com. Amy Winehouse and XTC were two of the best and I think I can blame credit [livejournal.com profile] nounsandverbs for my knowledge of both of them.

A movie (that's been around for a while) that you saw for the first time in 2007 I honestly can't think of any. I'm not a big movie person, and when I am in the mood I prefer to go to the theater.

An author you read for the last time in 2007 Brian W. Aldiss. I've got about 40 pages left in Helliconia Spring, and once I'm done with it I'm not going to pick up any by Aldiss ever again. The writing style is clunky and he uses this awful "little did anyone know that this seemingly insignificant thing was going to change the course of nations" gimmick on just about every page.

A band/musician you listened to for the last time in 2007 I can't think of any specific groups for this one.

A movie you watched for the last time in 2007 I don't think I'll be re-watching Rush Hour 3 or bothering with any future movies in the franchise.
jennythereader: (Default)
An author you read for the first time in 2007 I found several new (to me) authors this year. The two best were probably Elizabeth Bear and Charles De Lint. Other authors I found this year included Jo Walton, S.M. Stirling, and Stephen Baxter

A band/musician you heard for the first time in 2007 Bunches, most via Pandora.com. Amy Winehouse and XTC were two of the best and I think I can blame credit [livejournal.com profile] nounsandverbs for my knowledge of both of them.

A movie (that's been around for a while) that you saw for the first time in 2007 I honestly can't think of any. I'm not a big movie person, and when I am in the mood I prefer to go to the theater.

An author you read for the last time in 2007 Brian W. Aldiss. I've got about 40 pages left in Helliconia Spring, and once I'm done with it I'm not going to pick up any by Aldiss ever again. The writing style is clunky and he uses this awful "little did anyone know that this seemingly insignificant thing was going to change the course of nations" gimmick on just about every page.

A band/musician you listened to for the last time in 2007 I can't think of any specific groups for this one.

A movie you watched for the last time in 2007 I don't think I'll be re-watching Rush Hour 3 or bothering with any future movies in the franchise.
jennythereader: (Getting There *)
Anybody up for a movie?

The Palace Theatre is showing Some Like It Hot tomorrow night at 7. Tom & I are thinking about going. Is anyone else interested?

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