jennythereader: (Default)
Tonight I strained both the lavender and mint jars, and mixed them together along with some water and sugar.

The ratio was:
1 part Lavender-Vanilla vodka
2 parts Mint vodka
1 part water
1/3 part sugar

I had leftover Lavender-Vanilla vodka, so I bottled that up too. They're now sitting in the basement waiting to be tested in a month or so.
jennythereader: (Default)
Tonight I strained both the lavender and mint jars, and mixed them together along with some water and sugar.

The ratio was:
1 part Lavender-Vanilla vodka
2 parts Mint vodka
1 part water
1/3 part sugar

I had leftover Lavender-Vanilla vodka, so I bottled that up too. They're now sitting in the basement waiting to be tested in a month or so.
jennythereader: (Piglet: Stop and smell the flowers *)
Approximately 1/3 cup lavender blossoms
1 mexican vanilla bean, cut open
1 cup sugar
3 cups vodka

All of that is currently in a mason jar in the basement.

Tonight I'll add about half a cup of fresh mint leaves. I haven't quite decided if I'll add it directly to the jar with the lavender, or if I'll steep it in a separate jar and add the resulting mint-vodka later. Either way, I don't have any fresh mint in the house, so I have to go out and get it. It can wait until after supper.

In a separate mason jar:
approximately 1/2 cup fresh mint
1/3 cup sugar
1+ cup vodka

I'll shake both jars every few days, and strain them in about a month. At that point I'll also taste, and decide how to blend them.

Edited at 10:15pm, 6/24/12
jennythereader: (Piglet: Stop and smell the flowers *)
Approximately 1/3 cup lavender blossoms
1 mexican vanilla bean, cut open
1 cup sugar
3 cups vodka

All of that is currently in a mason jar in the basement.

Tonight I'll add about half a cup of fresh mint leaves. I haven't quite decided if I'll add it directly to the jar with the lavender, or if I'll steep it in a separate jar and add the resulting mint-vodka later. Either way, I don't have any fresh mint in the house, so I have to go out and get it. It can wait until after supper.

In a separate mason jar:
approximately 1/2 cup fresh mint
1/3 cup sugar
1+ cup vodka

I'll shake both jars every few days, and strain them in about a month. At that point I'll also taste, and decide how to blend them.

Edited at 10:15pm, 6/24/12
jennythereader: (* Midnight Stories *)
I wasn't anywhere in them. They were more like watching random snippets of a movie. Also, my brain seems to do some fairly cool fantasy world-building when I'm not trying.

This is what I remember:

- Some people had the ability to make ships travel long distances really quickly (interstellar? cross-dimension?)
- Some people could do other types of magic.
- A person could only do one type or the other
- Both ran in families
- most nations made use of both abilities in a fairly egalitarian way (allowing for the overall regency/Victorian Western Europe feel of the world as a whole)
- most nations allow intermarriage between both type of magicians and magicians and non-magicians
- one nation (sort of Czar-ist Russia feeling) had a ruling class made up of other magic users, who pretty much had absolute power over everybody in the country
- Russiain’t* enslaved the distance magicians, and basically treated them like draft animals
- Russiain’t leaders also did nasty magical experiments on the distance magicians, trying to figure out a way to do that magic themselves. The experiments frequently killed or burnt the magic out of the victims
- The distance magicians had originally all come from one region (faux-India?), and because Russiain’t had forced them to only interbreed with each-other they still looked distinctly different from the general populace in that country. In the rest of the world they had been able to marry as they pleased and so were more homogenized with the general population.

*naming convention swiped from [livejournal.com profile] matociquala (Elizabeth Bear)’s reports on her current work in progress.
jennythereader: (* Midnight Stories *)
I wasn't anywhere in them. They were more like watching random snippets of a movie. Also, my brain seems to do some fairly cool fantasy world-building when I'm not trying.

This is what I remember:

- Some people had the ability to make ships travel long distances really quickly (interstellar? cross-dimension?)
- Some people could do other types of magic.
- A person could only do one type or the other
- Both ran in families
- most nations made use of both abilities in a fairly egalitarian way (allowing for the overall regency/Victorian Western Europe feel of the world as a whole)
- most nations allow intermarriage between both type of magicians and magicians and non-magicians
- one nation (sort of Czar-ist Russia feeling) had a ruling class made up of other magic users, who pretty much had absolute power over everybody in the country
- Russiain’t* enslaved the distance magicians, and basically treated them like draft animals
- Russiain’t leaders also did nasty magical experiments on the distance magicians, trying to figure out a way to do that magic themselves. The experiments frequently killed or burnt the magic out of the victims
- The distance magicians had originally all come from one region (faux-India?), and because Russiain’t had forced them to only interbreed with each-other they still looked distinctly different from the general populace in that country. In the rest of the world they had been able to marry as they pleased and so were more homogenized with the general population.

*naming convention swiped from [livejournal.com profile] matociquala (Elizabeth Bear)’s reports on her current work in progress.
jennythereader: (Default)
Notes on this week's cordial:

1) about 5 cups of Bing cherries
2) 1 cup of 360 Chocolate Vodka
3) 3.5 cups regular vodka

Just like last week's, I need to shake it every couple of days, and I'll strain it and add the simple syrup in about 2 weeks.
jennythereader: (Default)
Notes on this week's cordial:

1) about 5 cups of Bing cherries
2) 1 cup of 360 Chocolate Vodka
3) 3.5 cups regular vodka

Just like last week's, I need to shake it every couple of days, and I'll strain it and add the simple syrup in about 2 weeks.
jennythereader: (Success)
I started my second cherry cordial (from now on called Cherry Cordial A) tonight. Mostly for my own reference, this is what I've done so far:

1) washed & pitted 6 cups of Bing cherries (which left my hands looking like I was trying out for Lady MacBeth)
2) put the cherries in a 1/2 gallon mason jar and covered them with 80 proof vodka
3) added a splash of lemon juice
4) took it down to the giant Rubbermaid bin in the basement that is the closest thing I have to a root cellar

I still need to:
1) Shake the jar every couple of days
2) Strain the cherries out in two weeks
3) Add the sugar syrup and (maybe) a tablespoon or so of this, if it needs it.
4) Let it sit for at least two weeks.

It will probably be drinkable by Pennsic, so I'll bring it along.

My goal is to start a new cordial every week, most likely on Tuesdays. Tom & I get our weekly farm share on Wednesdays, so it only makes sense to me to do something with each week's unused fruit.
jennythereader: (Success)
I started my second cherry cordial (from now on called Cherry Cordial A) tonight. Mostly for my own reference, this is what I've done so far:

1) washed & pitted 6 cups of Bing cherries (which left my hands looking like I was trying out for Lady MacBeth)
2) put the cherries in a 1/2 gallon mason jar and covered them with 80 proof vodka
3) added a splash of lemon juice
4) took it down to the giant Rubbermaid bin in the basement that is the closest thing I have to a root cellar

I still need to:
1) Shake the jar every couple of days
2) Strain the cherries out in two weeks
3) Add the sugar syrup and (maybe) a tablespoon or so of this, if it needs it.
4) Let it sit for at least two weeks.

It will probably be drinkable by Pennsic, so I'll bring it along.

My goal is to start a new cordial every week, most likely on Tuesdays. Tom & I get our weekly farm share on Wednesdays, so it only makes sense to me to do something with each week's unused fruit.
jennythereader: (creativereader.etsy.com)
The desktop chest of drawers I'm decorating for my friend [livejournal.com profile] purpura. At this point I'm almost done. The drawers and front of the mini-dresser are painted, the inside of the drawers are painted, and the paper is glued to the top and sides. All that's left to do is seal the paper in place with decoupage glue.


Front View:

Side View:
jennythereader: (creativereader.etsy.com)
The desktop chest of drawers I'm decorating for my friend [livejournal.com profile] purpura. At this point I'm almost done. The drawers and front of the mini-dresser are painted, the inside of the drawers are painted, and the paper is glued to the top and sides. All that's left to do is seal the paper in place with decoupage glue.


Front View:

Side View:
jennythereader: (creativereader.etsy.com)
I finally have enough things for sale in my shop that I think it's worthwhile trying to spread the word of it beyond my own circle of friends. If anybody feels like giving me a hand, I'd really appreciate it.

Here are some things you can do:
- Blog about me! Mention my shop (with a link) in a post here on LJ or anywhere else you blog. You could also do a post about your favorite thing I'm selling, with a link directly to that item.
- Give my whole shop or your favorite item from it a "thumbs up" in StumbleUpon, a link in Delicious, or do the equivalent in whatever social bookmarking site you use.
- Distribute business cards. Send me your street address, and I'll send you a couple dozen of my business cards for you to distribute.

My shop is here: CreativeReader.etsy.com

If any of you guys have ideas for promoting that I didn't think of go ahead and give them a try! Just let me know what they are so I can suggest them to others.
jennythereader: (creativereader.etsy.com)
I finally have enough things for sale in my shop that I think it's worthwhile trying to spread the word of it beyond my own circle of friends. If anybody feels like giving me a hand, I'd really appreciate it.

Here are some things you can do:
- Blog about me! Mention my shop (with a link) in a post here on LJ or anywhere else you blog. You could also do a post about your favorite thing I'm selling, with a link directly to that item.
- Give my whole shop or your favorite item from it a "thumbs up" in StumbleUpon, a link in Delicious, or do the equivalent in whatever social bookmarking site you use.
- Distribute business cards. Send me your street address, and I'll send you a couple dozen of my business cards for you to distribute.

My shop is here: CreativeReader.etsy.com

If any of you guys have ideas for promoting that I didn't think of go ahead and give them a try! Just let me know what they are so I can suggest them to others.
jennythereader: (* Cross-Stitched Dragon *)
The desktop chest of drawers I'm decorating for my friend [livejournal.com profile] purpura , after completing the second step: a second layer of paint on each of the drawers and the first layer of paint on the base.

jennythereader: (* Cross-Stitched Dragon *)
The desktop chest of drawers I'm decorating for my friend [livejournal.com profile] purpura , after completing the second step: a second layer of paint on each of the drawers and the first layer of paint on the base.

jennythereader: (* Cross-Stitched Dragon *)
The desktop chest of drawers I'm decorating for my friend [livejournal.com profile] purpura , after completing the first step: one layer of paint on each of the drawers.



jennythereader: (* Cross-Stitched Dragon *)
The desktop chest of drawers I'm decorating for my friend [livejournal.com profile] purpura , after completing the first step: one layer of paint on each of the drawers.



jennythereader: (creativereader.etsy.com)
Things I have learned about the art and craft of decoupage over the course of the last few days:

1) Cardstock works marginally better than I thought it would. By which I mean it is just barely possible to use it, if I tear the stuff into teeny-tiny pieces. If the piece is bigger than a penny, it's too big. I will never buy it on purpose, and will re-double my efforts to not get any by mistake. But, I will use up the package I did buy accidentally.

2) Origami paper works even better than I thought it would. In fact, it may be the ideal paper for decoupage. It's almost as pliable as tissue paper, but not nearly as fragile and prone to tearing when I don't want it to. It also comes in all sorts of pretty colors and prints.
jennythereader: (creativereader.etsy.com)
Things I have learned about the art and craft of decoupage over the course of the last few days:

1) Cardstock works marginally better than I thought it would. By which I mean it is just barely possible to use it, if I tear the stuff into teeny-tiny pieces. If the piece is bigger than a penny, it's too big. I will never buy it on purpose, and will re-double my efforts to not get any by mistake. But, I will use up the package I did buy accidentally.

2) Origami paper works even better than I thought it would. In fact, it may be the ideal paper for decoupage. It's almost as pliable as tissue paper, but not nearly as fragile and prone to tearing when I don't want it to. It also comes in all sorts of pretty colors and prints.

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