Road Trip!

Sep. 17th, 2012 11:57 am
jennythereader: (John Lennon)
I'm back to the usual routine after a wonderful mid-week road trip to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

My travelling companion, [livejournal.com profile] nounsandverbs, describes our adventures better than I can.

Road Trip!

Sep. 17th, 2012 11:57 am
jennythereader: (John Lennon)
I'm back to the usual routine after a wonderful mid-week road trip to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

My travelling companion, [livejournal.com profile] nounsandverbs, describes our adventures better than I can.
jennythereader: (Lily)
By now everyone who knows [livejournal.com profile] purpura has probably heard about her current state of health. (If you haven't, let me know and I'll summerize and point you towards more detail.)

If anyone is on Pinterest and wants to help find Cool Stuff for Katie let me know. I'll add you to the list of folks allowed to add pins to the board.

If you want to help but aren't on Pinterest, ask me for an invite. I'll need an email address, so you'll probably want to message me rather than comment.
jennythereader: (Lily)
By now everyone who knows [livejournal.com profile] purpura has probably heard about her current state of health. (If you haven't, let me know and I'll summerize and point you towards more detail.)

If anyone is on Pinterest and wants to help find Cool Stuff for Katie let me know. I'll add you to the list of folks allowed to add pins to the board.

If you want to help but aren't on Pinterest, ask me for an invite. I'll need an email address, so you'll probably want to message me rather than comment.
jennythereader: (Default)
Back here, I said I had a post brewing on this topic.

The way I see it, there are three major ways fan authors are depicting Captain America's adjustment to the strange new version of America he's found himself in.

1) He adapts with no problems at all, other than a tendency to not get pop culture references. This pretty much always includes an very modern attitude towards sexual behavior. At the most extreme, authors who take this route have Steve falling into bed with anybody who wiggles their eyebrows at him, and picking up new technology almost as easily as Stark.

I feel that short of changing him into a villain, this is about as far from Captain America's character as it's possible to be. Luckily most of the fandom seems to agree with me and it seems to be the least common depiction.

**********

2) He can't adapt at all. It's too new, too busy, too selfish and hedonistic for someone as straitlaced and moral as Steve Rogers. At the far extreme he can't deal with women or minorities in power, the idea of people being open about their homosexuality freaks him out (much less the idea of marriage equality), how comfortable people are with sexuality in general grosses him out, and he even loses it when people swear around him.

I feel that while the less extreme versions of this might hold true for "random 1940's guy dumped into the 2010's," in general it's only a slightly more accurate a depiction of Cap than the first one is. Helping the underdog is just too much a part of his personality for me to believe he would freak out when society starts to think that maybe there shouldn't be underdogs at all. The most extreme versions of this depiction are almost as rare as (1), but the milder versions are a lot more common, and bleed into (3).

This one seems to come from a combination of authors mistaking Steve's lack of first-hand sexual experience for prudery and a misunderstanding of the 1930's & 1940's. Just because the movies of the era that are still available are mostly pretty clean doesn't mean that everyone's behavior was all the time. As my grandmother said to me once, people are still people no matter when they live. All that changes is how public they're able to be about it.

**********

3) Steve is frequently surprised and confused, but once he wraps his mind around them he thinks most of the changes are for the better, or at least neutral. To me, this version is the most true to character and thankfully it seems to be the most common.

Captain America really is Captain Steve Rogers of the US Army, and I guarantee that even if he wasn't getting up to shenanigans himself, between his time with the USO and his time fighting in Europe he had plenty of opportunity to witness as much as he cared to and probably a bit more. He led an elite unit that was racially integrated and worked with/dated a woman officer who outranked him. As I said above, he stood up for the little guy every chance he had, even when he couldn't actually make a difference, and I just can't picture him disapproving of wider society catching up.

I'm never sure how much sense this sort of post will make to other people, so I might do some editing to clarify things. I'll try to note it if I do.
Edits: 6-7-12; 9:37am I made a few formatting and punctuation changes that hopefully will make this a little clearer.
jennythereader: (Default)
Back here, I said I had a post brewing on this topic.

The way I see it, there are three major ways fan authors are depicting Captain America's adjustment to the strange new version of America he's found himself in.

1) He adapts with no problems at all, other than a tendency to not get pop culture references. This pretty much always includes an very modern attitude towards sexual behavior. At the most extreme, authors who take this route have Steve falling into bed with anybody who wiggles their eyebrows at him, and picking up new technology almost as easily as Stark.

I feel that short of changing him into a villain, this is about as far from Captain America's character as it's possible to be. Luckily most of the fandom seems to agree with me and it seems to be the least common depiction.

**********

2) He can't adapt at all. It's too new, too busy, too selfish and hedonistic for someone as straitlaced and moral as Steve Rogers. At the far extreme he can't deal with women or minorities in power, the idea of people being open about their homosexuality freaks him out (much less the idea of marriage equality), how comfortable people are with sexuality in general grosses him out, and he even loses it when people swear around him.

I feel that while the less extreme versions of this might hold true for "random 1940's guy dumped into the 2010's," in general it's only a slightly more accurate a depiction of Cap than the first one is. Helping the underdog is just too much a part of his personality for me to believe he would freak out when society starts to think that maybe there shouldn't be underdogs at all. The most extreme versions of this depiction are almost as rare as (1), but the milder versions are a lot more common, and bleed into (3).

This one seems to come from a combination of authors mistaking Steve's lack of first-hand sexual experience for prudery and a misunderstanding of the 1930's & 1940's. Just because the movies of the era that are still available are mostly pretty clean doesn't mean that everyone's behavior was all the time. As my grandmother said to me once, people are still people no matter when they live. All that changes is how public they're able to be about it.

**********

3) Steve is frequently surprised and confused, but once he wraps his mind around them he thinks most of the changes are for the better, or at least neutral. To me, this version is the most true to character and thankfully it seems to be the most common.

Captain America really is Captain Steve Rogers of the US Army, and I guarantee that even if he wasn't getting up to shenanigans himself, between his time with the USO and his time fighting in Europe he had plenty of opportunity to witness as much as he cared to and probably a bit more. He led an elite unit that was racially integrated and worked with/dated a woman officer who outranked him. As I said above, he stood up for the little guy every chance he had, even when he couldn't actually make a difference, and I just can't picture him disapproving of wider society catching up.

I'm never sure how much sense this sort of post will make to other people, so I might do some editing to clarify things. I'll try to note it if I do.
Edits: 6-7-12; 9:37am I made a few formatting and punctuation changes that hopefully will make this a little clearer.

A gift

Mar. 6th, 2012 11:34 am
jennythereader: (Riker Smirk)
Christina Hendricks, dressed in leather, posing with weapons.

To all the geek boys (and, I suspect, goodly chunks of the non-geek boys and the girls) on my flist: you're welcome. :)

A gift

Mar. 6th, 2012 11:34 am
jennythereader: (Riker Smirk)
Christina Hendricks, dressed in leather, posing with weapons.

To all the geek boys (and, I suspect, goodly chunks of the non-geek boys and the girls) on my flist: you're welcome. :)
jennythereader: (Professor Cat *)
Inspired by A Way With Words, the podcast I'm listening to today, I have a question for everybody:

How do you refer to an out of the way part of something? For example, you're at the mall and the parking lot is full enough that you need to use the outermost part of the lot, and end up with a long walk to the place where you're meeting your friends. When you meet up with them you say "I'm so sorry, the lot was packed and I had to park ________."

How do you fill in the blank?

I'd most likely fill it in with either in the back 40, or in the north 40.

Edit: If I was really annoyed, I might say in the back of beyond.
jennythereader: (Professor Cat *)
Inspired by A Way With Words, the podcast I'm listening to today, I have a question for everybody:

How do you refer to an out of the way part of something? For example, you're at the mall and the parking lot is full enough that you need to use the outermost part of the lot, and end up with a long walk to the place where you're meeting your friends. When you meet up with them you say "I'm so sorry, the lot was packed and I had to park ________."

How do you fill in the blank?

I'd most likely fill it in with either in the back 40, or in the north 40.

Edit: If I was really annoyed, I might say in the back of beyond.
jennythereader: (* Card Catalog)
I've pretty much decided that I'm going to get myself a new Kindle by the end of the year.

Right now, the new touch screen model that they just announced is the front runner. On the other hand, the Kindle Fire is calling my name.

I'll probably waffle until some time in December, and end up going with the Touch. :)
jennythereader: (* Card Catalog)
I've pretty much decided that I'm going to get myself a new Kindle by the end of the year.

Right now, the new touch screen model that they just announced is the front runner. On the other hand, the Kindle Fire is calling my name.

I'll probably waffle until some time in December, and end up going with the Touch. :)
jennythereader: (Default)
A small collection of links by Jenny, age 32 and 11/12ths

Already Pretty - Sally is a fashion blogger who has both an attitude towards fashion and a personal style that I love. (And in the "it's a small, small world" category: she and Tom dated while they were in college. My husband, he has consistent taste in women.)

Punk Domestics - A blog collecting tutorials and tips on 21st century kitchen-craft. Mostly information on different ways to grow and preserve food.

Sonic Living - You tell this site where you live, and give them a list of artists you want to see. They'll email when there's a concert you might be interested in within about 40 miles of you. They will also sync with Pandora, Last.fm, iTunes, Slacker, and Blip.fm.

Pinterest - Pinterest is a social bookmarking site, but it's a lot more fun than Delicious or other sites like it. I use to to keep track of recipes, crafts, clothing, makeup, and decorating ideas I find as I'm wandering the internet. It's still in beta testing, so if you want an invitation let me know.

Outblush - In their own words "Outblush is a blog for girls who love to shop." I've found a lot of cool things by following them.

Girl Genius - Girl Genius is a webcomic (the link is to the first strip) about a young woman finding her place in the world. It's just that her world has talking cats, green-hair barbarian princesses, clockwork robots the size of small buildings, monsters with a serious thing for hats, and self-aware talking castles. Start at the beginning or it won't make any sense at all.

Google Reader - Probably the best RSS reader out there right now. Click on the "Add a subscription" button, and copy the address of (almost) any site you like into the window that pops up. Any new additions to that site will show up in your reader. You can follow as many sites as you want, all in one place.
jennythereader: (Default)
A small collection of links by Jenny, age 32 and 11/12ths

Already Pretty - Sally is a fashion blogger who has both an attitude towards fashion and a personal style that I love. (And in the "it's a small, small world" category: she and Tom dated while they were in college. My husband, he has consistent taste in women.)

Punk Domestics - A blog collecting tutorials and tips on 21st century kitchen-craft. Mostly information on different ways to grow and preserve food.

Sonic Living - You tell this site where you live, and give them a list of artists you want to see. They'll email when there's a concert you might be interested in within about 40 miles of you. They will also sync with Pandora, Last.fm, iTunes, Slacker, and Blip.fm.

Pinterest - Pinterest is a social bookmarking site, but it's a lot more fun than Delicious or other sites like it. I use to to keep track of recipes, crafts, clothing, makeup, and decorating ideas I find as I'm wandering the internet. It's still in beta testing, so if you want an invitation let me know.

Outblush - In their own words "Outblush is a blog for girls who love to shop." I've found a lot of cool things by following them.

Girl Genius - Girl Genius is a webcomic (the link is to the first strip) about a young woman finding her place in the world. It's just that her world has talking cats, green-hair barbarian princesses, clockwork robots the size of small buildings, monsters with a serious thing for hats, and self-aware talking castles. Start at the beginning or it won't make any sense at all.

Google Reader - Probably the best RSS reader out there right now. Click on the "Add a subscription" button, and copy the address of (almost) any site you like into the window that pops up. Any new additions to that site will show up in your reader. You can follow as many sites as you want, all in one place.
jennythereader: (Success)
Next Friday, work is encourging everybody to wear a jersey from their favorite sports team.

I debating between an MSU shirt, a Pennsic University shirt, and a Transylvania Polygnostic shirt (again, I'd probably have to make one).

The MSU shirt is probably easiest, but not nearly as much fun as either of the more geeky options.

What do you guys think I should go with?
jennythereader: (Success)
Next Friday, work is encourging everybody to wear a jersey from their favorite sports team.

I debating between an MSU shirt, a Pennsic University shirt, and a Transylvania Polygnostic shirt (again, I'd probably have to make one).

The MSU shirt is probably easiest, but not nearly as much fun as either of the more geeky options.

What do you guys think I should go with?
jennythereader: (* Card Catalog)
I've been thinking about how to sub-divide my science fiction books. The categories I see most people use ("Hard" vs "Soft," or "Space Opera," "Military SF," and the like) don't really work for me. They're too subjective and hard to define.

After a lot of thought I think I've come up with one story characteristic that is always a question in science fiction, but can be objectively evaluated: how far from Earth has human civilization spread? This also has the advantage of being similar to the trait I used for my Fantasy categories.

So, these are the categories I'll be using:
- Earthbound Human civilization only exists on Earth. There may be a tiny research presence on other bodies or artificial stations, but if an extinction level event happens to the planet the species is toast. Examples: The real world.

- Earth System There are significant numbers of people living in a permanent settlement on the moon or in other (natural or artificial) satellites orbiting Earth. The species might survive an extinction event, but not easily. Examples: The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein.

- Sol System Humanity has spread through a significant portion of this star system, but has no significant presence around any other stars. The species would survive most disasters that only affect Earth, but is still vulnerable to Sol going nova or a similar disaster. Examples: ? (Can't think of any right now.)

- Local Systems Humanity has settlements at some of the nearer star systems, but has not spread into the majority of the Milky Way galaxy. Examples: ? (I'm drawing a blank at the moment.)

- Galactic Humanity has spread throughout this galaxy, but not beyond it. Examples: Dune by Frank Herbert

- Inter-Galactic Humanity has a significant presence in multiple galaxies. Examples: ? (still blanking)

Comments? Suggestions? Examples? (I'll edit examples of my own in as I think of them.)
jennythereader: (Default)
that I need to suck it up and go back to school and get a library science degree:

Yesterday I spent all evening laying in bed stoned to the gills on pain pills (BAD knee day).

Can you guess what activity I decided was mindless/easy enough that I wouldn't mess it up, but interesting enough to be worth doing?

Organizing the books in my Kindle.
jennythereader: (Default)
that I need to suck it up and go back to school and get a library science degree:

Yesterday I spent all evening laying in bed stoned to the gills on pain pills (BAD knee day).

Can you guess what activity I decided was mindless/easy enough that I wouldn't mess it up, but interesting enough to be worth doing?

Organizing the books in my Kindle.
jennythereader: (Giles 012)
The recent wedding of England's Prince William got me thinking about this.

Assume that for some reason the American public has decided that we want a monarch of our own. You have been put on the committee implementing it. Who do you chose to be the first monarch, how will the line of succession work, and what duties will the monarch have?

My answers are behind the cut )
Wow. I had no idea I'd put that much thought into this.

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